Modernizing Management of the Most Important Fish in the Sea

John Gans - Theodore Roosevelt Conservation Partnership

Anglers up and down the Atlantic coast know that a shortcut to finding gamefish is to follow the birds. When birds are working on the horizon, dive-bombing schools of menhaden—the meal that's also critical to many popular gamefish—you can't get out of the no-wake zone fast enough. It is going to be a good day of fishing.
          Atlantic menhaden, also known as pogey or bunker, are high-protein forage fish that striped bass, tuna, mackerel, sharks, drum, cobia, and tarpon from Maine to Florida depend on for food. You name it, if you are casting a line to it, it's most likely feeding on menhaden.
         Menhaden also help filter water and improve marine habitats. By feeding on algae-causing plankton, an adult menhaden can filter 2.4 gallons of water per minute. Their importance to the ecosystem is clear. Remove them, and the system breaks down.
         Simply put, there is no fish that means more to the East Coast than Atlantic menhaden, and their future is being determined right now.